Cease-Fire

Over three years, the boundary between North and South Korea went back and forth as neither combatant succeeded in completely overtaking their enemy. By the time that leaders on both sides finally agreed to a cease-fire in July of 1953, nearly 6 million American troops had been involved in the conflict. The border between North and South remained nearly the same as it was when the war started, located around the 38th parallel of the Korean peninsula. It is still there today.

General W. K. Harrison, Jr., left, and North Korean General Nam Il, right, sign armistice documents ending 3-year Korean War on July 23, 1953. National Archives and Records Administration, Identifier 520995
General W. K. Harrison, Jr., left, and North Korean General Nam Il, right, sign armistice documents ending 3-year Korean War on July 23, 1953. National Archives and Records Administration, Identifier 520995

Even though the U.S. and its allies did not win the Korean War, they still prevented Communist forces from taking the entire peninsula. It was the first test for the U.N.’s worldwide police force during the Cold War. But in the years following, the war faded from memory and became known as the “Forgotten War” – even by those who fought it, like Marcel Froneyberger.

"After Korea, they told us, 'Well you’re back now, forget it ever happened. Best thing you could do is forget about it…' So more or less that’s what we did… Forget about it, that was the thing. Forget about it."

Marcel Froneyberger

Use the page links below for additional information, or return to the exhibit's home page.